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Your Weekly Constitutional
You are a part of the American Experiment.
Category: News & Politics
Location: Virginia, USA
Produced in partnership with James Madison's Montpelier, Your Weekly Constitutional is a public radio show featuring lively discussion of controversial constitutional topics, from Gay Rights to Gun Rights. Find us on Facebook and iTunes!
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We are a radio show about interesting and controversial issues involving the United States Constitution, issues like Gay Rights...


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January 19, 2013 10:03 AM PST

Soldiers rounding up people in the streets. Innocent people. Law-abiding citizens. Children. Transporting them to remote camps surrounded by barbed wire and armed guards.

No, we're not talking about Nazi Germany. Not the Soviet Union. Not North Korea, either.

We're talking about the United States of America. And we're not kidding.

January 12, 2013 08:50 AM PST

What's your favorite holiday? Christmas? The Fourth of July? Arbor Day?

Those are all fine choices, but here at Your Weekly Constitutional we have our own particular favorite: September 17 - CONSTITUTION DAY!

Join us for good times with James and Dolley Madison on a sunny day filled with warm breezes, cool drinks and good conversation -- a party in September at Montpelier.

January 04, 2013 07:06 AM PST

Gay Rights, Free Speech, Pro Football -- who could ask for anything more?

We'll talk to Chris Kluwe, punter for the Minnesota Vikings, who wrote an open letter about these strangely-related subjects, a letter laced with inventive and hilarious profanity. It was published on the Huffington Post and became an internet sensation.

Chris, who also dominates online video games and plays bass with the band Tripping Icarus, is not your average NFL player and this is not your average episode. Indeed, some of the language discussed may not be appropriate for younger listeners. But join us anyway. You've heard these words before. Well, most of them.

December 28, 2012 06:37 AM PST

Awhile back, we did an episode on Compulsory Vaccination that focused upon whether you have a constitutional right to refuse state-mandated innoculations.

The response was overwhelming. Many of you wanted more discussion of the underlying medical issues - not just whether we have a "liberty interest" in refusing vaccinations, but whether doing so is a good idea. So here it is: "Compulsory Vaccination II: The Rest of the Story."

December 21, 2012 02:35 PM PST

We join Meg Kennedy on a worldwide manhunt - well, actually, it's more like a furniture hunt.

Meg is the Acting Director of Museum Programs at James Madison's Montpelier, which means that she's in charge of finding original pieces of furnture, decorations and documents to bring back to the Madison home, no matter where in the world the search may take her.

Meg is a historical Nancy Drew - and, yes, she even talks about an old clock.

December 14, 2012 04:49 AM PST

We'll speak with Catherine Allgor about her new book, "The Queen of America," which discusses not only Dolley Madison, but also Mary Cutts, the relatively unknown woman who gave us almost everything we know about Dolley.

Mary Cutts is an example of the "vanishing women" of American history, women whose many and significant contributions have been obscured not only by the passage of time, but by the times in which they lived.

Join us for an enlightening interview with Professor Allgor, and for excerpts from her November, 2012 presentation at Montpelier.

December 07, 2012 06:13 AM PST

No, not that President. Another president, and one who knows a great deal about the subject: Jonathan R. Alger, the new President of James Madison University. In his old job as Assistant General Counsel at the University of Michigan, President Alger oversaw two of the most important affirmative action cases in U.S. history. Those two cases - Grutter and Gratz - emphasized the importance of diversity in higher education. And those two cases might get reversed this term.

Is educational diversity a constitutional basis for affirmative action programs in college and university admissions? Join us for the inside story of the Grutter and Gratz cases, and what might happen to them when the the Supreme Court decides Fisher v. the University of Texas.

November 30, 2012 06:53 AM PST

The State of Georgia has miles and miles of beautiful highways, and the Ku Klux Klan wants to adopt one. But the Governor doesn't think that's such a good idea.

Now the Klan has a lawyer - two lawyers, actually - from the Georgia branch of the American Civil Liberties Union. And we talked to both of them. We also talked to the head of the Georgia branch of the ACLU and asked her why she would agree to represent such clients.

It doesn't get any better than this.

November 23, 2012 05:03 AM PST

Ever think that the Founders were a bunch of demigods with chiseled features, carved in marble and mounted on pedestals, who spent their lives striking poses and making memorable speeches? Yeah, we did too. Then we grew up.

And when we started really studying our Founders, we learned something: while many of them were extraordinary people, they were also, well, people. And that means that they had flaws. Some more than others.

This is the story of one particular Founder who had more than his share of - ahem - moral flexibility, a fellow who did some extraordinary things, but who also had a few of what our younger listeners might call Epic Fails. His name was William Blount, and we call him our Founding Scoundrel.

November 15, 2012 02:07 PM PST

Ever feel like somebody's watching you? Well maybe someone is.

We talk to a federal magistrate who is very concerned about the remarkable number of secret surveillance orders being issued by the courts, orders that enable the government to access your text messages, emails, and even to track your mobile phone's location - all without your knowledge.

Don't believe us? Ask David Petraeus. Or simply listen to this episode - but you may want to use somebody else's computer.

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