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Your Weekly Constitutional
You are a part of the American Experiment.
Category: News & Politics
Location: Virginia, USA
Produced in partnership with James Madison's Montpelier, Your Weekly Constitutional is a public radio show featuring lively discussion of controversial constitutional topics, from Gay Rights to Gun Rights. Find us on Facebook and iTunes!
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We are a radio show about interesting and controversial issues involving the United States Constitution, issues like Gay Rights...


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August 13, 2016 04:47 AM PDT

You may have heard of something called “Title IX.” But what, precisely, is it?

It seems to have something to do with sports, or perhaps with sexual assault, or maybe it’s something that affects colleges? Or maybe all three?

It can get a bit obscure. Fortunately, we have law professor Patrick Baker of the University of Tennessee at Martin to explain it to us. Please be advised, however: this episode contains discussion that might be inappropriate for young children.

August 08, 2016 11:40 AM PDT

We revisit the European Union (or what’s left of it) with Part II of “Brexit! OMG!” Join us for a conversation with British law professor William Walton all about what's in store for Britain (and Europe, and the rest of the world) now that Brexit has happened. OMG!

July 30, 2016 05:34 AM PDT

Well, it’s happened. We didn’t think it would happen, but it has.

No, we’re not talking about the nomination of Donald Trump. We’re talking about Brexit, which represents, in the United Kingdom, a constitutional change of historic proportions and uncertain consequences.

Fortunately, we have William Walton of Northumbria University to explain it all to us.

July 23, 2016 09:22 AM PDT

You’ve heard of Confederates. But have you heard of “Confederados?” The terms are related, but as the variation in spelling suggests, there’s a linguistic and geographical difference.

It seems that a number of unhappy Confederates left the United States after our Civil War and emigrated to places where they could continue to own slaves. Among those places was Brazil, where such people were called “Confederados,” and where their descendants live to this day.

Two Brazilian historians, Luciana da Cruz Brito and Helena Maria Machado, will tell us the tale. It's a story that is not only compelling, but which also brings home an important point: African slavery was not just a problem in the United States, but throughout the Americas, and indeed, throughout much of the world.

July 15, 2016 02:54 PM PDT

What does baseball have to do with constitutional law? Quite a bit, it turns out.

Stewart will explain it to you, along with YWC’s Executive Producer, Wayne Winkler, who’s a bit skeptical.

Stewart will also interview historian, constitutional lawyer and author David O. Stewart about his latest book, The Babe Ruth Deception, which tells a tale set in the early 20th Century, a time when baseball truly became "the national pastime."

Play ball!

July 08, 2016 08:57 AM PDT

You’ve heard of Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, who famously asked her husband to “remember the ladies” when he and his fellow revolutionaries drafted a legal code for the new nation they were creating. But have you ever heard of Louisa Adams, the wife of John Quincy Adams?

Turns out that Louisa was pretty outspoken, too -- mostly in her diaries and other writings, in which she documented her many travels and adventures over several tumultuous decades of our early constitutional history.

Please join us for a fascinating discussion with author Louisa Thomas (no relation) who has written a new biography of this largely-overlooked American woman.

July 01, 2016 12:05 PM PDT

We tend to think of constitutional cases as happening “out there, somewhere.” But they can arise anywhere the Constitution applies, and it applies everywhere in the United States – including in your own back yard.

Recently, a significant constitutional case arose in our back yard, and a local attorney, Dennis Jones, took it all the way to the Supreme Court – assisted by three of Stewart’s law students.

June 26, 2016 08:25 AM PDT

If any institution should value and protect free speech, it is the university. After all, isn’t that what colleges and universities are for? Free inquiry and free exchange of ideas? And, in the case of state institutions, there’s that pesky First Amendment thing, too.

But lately, some people are calling for restrictions on speech at universities, even attempting to punish those with whom they disagree. Remarkably, some faculty members have joined in this attempt, including, most notably, Melissa Click, a former teacher -- of journalism! -- at the University of Missouri.

What is happening on our college campuses? Time to call in our First Amendment Guy, Doug McKechnie

June 17, 2016 07:38 AM PDT

Most of us have heard about the trans-Atlantic slave trade, one of the worst aspects of African-American slavery. But what happened to enslaved Africans once they reached the East Coast of the United States?

As it turns out, many of them still had a long way to go, into the even worse conditions in the interior of the Deep South, along routes that author Edward Ball calls “The Slave Trail of Tears.”

Join us for a disturbing, but riveting, discussion of this little-known chapter of American constitutional history.

June 11, 2016 08:21 AM PDT

Once upon a time, the idea of a woman serving on the United States Supreme Court seemed strange, perhaps unattainable. Then along came Sandra Day O’Connor, and, a few years later, Ruth Bader Ginsberg. The Court, and the nation, haven’t been the same since.

This week, author Linda Hirshman will tell us all about it. Her new book about the High Court’s first two female Justices and their personal and professional relationships is called Sisters-in-Law: How Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World.

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