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Your Weekly Constitutional
You are a part of the American Experiment.
Category: News & Politics
Location: Virginia, USA
Produced in partnership with James Madison's Montpelier, Your Weekly Constitutional is a public radio show featuring lively discussion of controversial constitutional topics, from Gay Rights to Gun Rights. Find us on Facebook and iTunes!
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We are a radio show about interesting and controversial issues involving the United States Constitution, issues like Gay Rights...


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May 21, 2016 04:16 AM PDT

This week, we continue our discussion of Brexit – the proposed exit of Britain from the European Union – with Northumbria University law professor William Walton and his student, Melissa Davis, who just happens to also be a city councillor in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. We then broaden our discussion, both in terms of topics and participants, by inviting some of William’s other law students into the studio. These young Britons have much to say, not only about Brexit, but about the differences between British and American constitutionalism – think guns and law enforcement – as well as the similarities – think “devolution” of power to regions of Britain, as compared with “states’ rights” arguments in the United States. Join us for a variety of youthful perspectives and remarkable accents.

May 14, 2016 10:28 AM PDT

You’ve heard of something called “Brexit,” but what is it?

Turns out, Brexit is shorthand for the possibility of a British exit from the European Union. Britons will soon vote on Brexit, and the polls show the election too close to call.

Such an exit, if it occurs, will have major constitutional implications for the United Kingdom, and a major impact on the rest of the world, including the United States. Good thing we’ve got Northumbria University law professor William Walton to explain it all to us. William is joined by one of his students, Melissa Davis, who is also a city councillor in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

In Part II, we'll talk to several other of William's law students. These young people have some definite opinions on a wide range of subjects, including, of course, Brexit. So stay tuned.

May 08, 2016 12:15 PM PDT

There aren’t many Nazi war criminals left to punish. But one of the last to be brought to justice is also among the most fascinating.

Join us as Lawrence Douglas, a professor at Amherst, tells us all about the man at the center of this strange and surprising case. Lawrence is the author of "The Right Wrong Man: John Demjanjuk and the Last Great Nazi War Crimes Trial."

April 29, 2016 03:00 AM PDT

What's going on in North Carolina? Paypal is cancelling expansion plans, other state governments are refusing to visit, and Bruce Springsteen -- Springsteen! -- has cancelled a concert.

Apparently, our good friends in NC are now at ground zero in the culture war, which increasingly pits rural Republicans against urban Democrats. The city of Charlotte passed an antidiscrimination ordinance protecting LGBT rights, and the state called a special legislative session to repeal it. Governor McCrory immediately signed the repeal statute. Apparently, the big issue is the use of public bathrooms by transgendered people. Oh, boy . . . or, perhaps we should say, oh, girl . . . .

April 14, 2016 07:37 AM PDT

In this extraordinary election year of 2016 we keep hearing a lot of dark references to “populism” on both the left and the right. But what does “populism” mean, and why does it have such a negative connotation? Aren’t we a popular democracy? And isn’t democracy good?

Woody Holton, a University of South Carolina history professor, thinks that democracy is, in fact, a good thing - at least sometimes. He’s even written a book about it: "Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution."

Woody’s story contrasts with the history you probably learned in high school, where George Washington, James Madison and a few other rich guys did all the heavy lifting. As it turns out, they had lots of help.

March 12, 2016 04:40 AM PST

The death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia has led to a titanic political and constitutional struggle between the President and Congress. Will the Constitution dictate an outcome? Or will the political process offer the only hope of a resolution?

Join Stewart and Professor James P. Melcher of the University of Maine at Farmington as they address the question: what will happen After Scalia?

March 04, 2016 08:17 AM PST

To be President of the United States, the Constitution requires you to be a "natural born Citizen." But what does that mean? Specifically, what does it mean for Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz?

The answer may surprise you. Join us for a fascinating discussion with two law professors who'll tell us all about it. And don't forget your birth certificate.

February 26, 2016 06:51 AM PST

It's been six years since the Supreme Court has ruled on a Second Amendment case. What's up with that?

Plenty, it turns out. This week, Stewart speaks with two experts on the Second Amendment, law professor Adam Winkler of UCLA, and gun rights advocate David Kopel from the Cato Institute.

February 19, 2016 07:29 AM PST

To paraphrase Forrest Gump, money and politics go together like peas and carrots. That's especially true since the Citizens United decision came down in 2010. And a number of people are very concerned about it.

Join Stewart and author Derek Cressman for a discussion of his new book, "When Money Talks: The High Price of 'Free' Speech and the Selling of Democracy."

February 12, 2016 10:24 AM PST

After centuries of neglect, Alexander Hamilton is finally having his historical moment.

Join Stewart and ConSource Executive Director Julie Silverbrook as they discuss one of the most under-appreciated of the Founders, a fellow they call "Ham the Man."

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